History Courses

United States History II (Grade 9)
Course Credit:1
Duration:Full Year

U.S. History II is designed as a continuation of U.S. History I. In this course, the students will be introduced to the study of U.S. History from the post Civil War period through the 1970’s, including the Vietnam War and the Watergate Scandal. In addition, the course will examine major events at the end of the Cold War as well as the Persian Gulf War (1991). Where possible, current events will be tied in as they relate to the historical events being studied. This is a survey class that introduces major topics, focusing on the key issues, people and events. The course will combine extensive text work, note taking, political cartoon analysis, class discussion and class activities. There will be a major research-based project each term. The course is required of all freshmen.

Textbook Titles: American Voices, Carol Berkins, et al (Scott Foresman)


Ancient and Medieval History–Honors (Grades 11 & 12)
(Alternates with Modern European History) Next offered 2012-2013

Course Credit:1
Duration:Full Year

This is a survey course in which a number of major trends in the early development of western civilization from the beginning of recorded history to the medieval period are studied. The study of prehistoric man and evolution, the origins of civilization in major river valleys, the Greek and Roman worlds, the rise of Christianity and medieval Europe constitute the Western focal points of the course. Asian civilizations, the Byzantine Empire and its role, forces of Islam, and civilizations in Africa and the Americas are also included. The time frame for this study is four million B.P. to the fifteenth century C.E.
Extensive reading will be a requirement, and a minimum of one project each marking period will be assigned. One term paper and an in-depth book analysis are required. A variety of experiences are provided with an emphasis on art in history, the theater as reflective of society, map making of key ancient empires, music and society, and literature as an insight into society. Higher order thinking skills are stressed and encouraged. This course is offered for those students who are prepared to devote a good deal of time and energy to a serious study of history.

Textbook Title: The Western Heritage, 7th ed. (Prentice Hall)


Modern European History-Honors (Grades 11 & 12)
(Alternates years with Ancient and Medieval History)

Course Credit:1
Duration:Full Year

This course offers the student an opportunity for a thorough examination of study topics which include the Renaissance and Reformation, development of central governments in Europe, trade and exploration, revolutions, industrialization, nationalism, imperialism, and the growth of technology. The twentieth century is included with focus on two world wars, totalitarianism, socialism, fascism, and democracy. A glance at Asian, African, and Latin American developments which occur as parallel history are injected. The time frame for this study is the fifteenth century to the twentieth century C.E. Extensive reading will be a requirement, and a minimum of one project each marking period will be assigned. One term paper and an in-depth book analysis are required. A variety of experiences are provided with an emphasis on art in history, the theater as reflective of society, mapmaking of the Treaty of Westphalia, music and society, films and literature as an insight into society. Higher order thinking skills are stressed and encouraged. This course dealing with the study of political, economics, and society development of Europe over the period of the past four centuries is offered for those students who wish to devote a good deal of time and energy to a serious study of history.

Textbook Titles: The Western Heritage, 7th ed. (Prentice Hall)
A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens
All Quiet on the Western Front, Erich Maria Remarque


Twentieth Century American History–Honors (Grade 12)
Course Credit:1
Duration:Full Year

This honors level American History course is designed to provide students with a sophisticated understanding of the social, political, cultural, and economic history of the United States from 1900 to the present. The course examines America's industrial development and the growth of an affluent society. Emphasis during the first semester will be placed on the emergence of the U.S. as a major world power in the twentieth century, the forces shaping foreign policy, and the challenges facing America in the post-Cold War period. During the second semester, we will focus on Domestic Policy issues such as Civil Rights, Feminism, Youth and The New Left and Counterculture, and Political Institutions.
Extensive reading and research will be required. Term and/or semester projects will be assigned. This course is offered to those students who are prepared to invest a good deal of time and energy to the study of history.

Textbook Titles: Cycles of American History, Arthur M. Schlesinger
The Glory and the Dream, William Manchester
The Twentieth Century: A People’s History, Howard Zinn


Nineteenth Century U.S. History – Honors (Grades 11 & 12)
Course Credit:1
Duration:Full Year

This course will follow the society, culture, economy and politics of Americans from the formative years of the country in 1800 through becoming a world power at the end of the 19th century. Topics will take account of politics and political development, the Industrial Revolution and labor, reform movements, the west, military development, and international policy. Selected areas of focus will include the following: the presidency of Thomas Jefferson and the Louisiana Purchase, President Jackson and the expanding role of democracy, Manifest Destiny and Slavery, Secession and Civil War, President Lincoln, Reconstruction and westward expansion. Greater understanding of this time period will also be attained through the study of art, music and literature. All students will be required to complete two research projects.

Textbook Titles: The Americans: The National Experience, Daniel Boorstin
Uncle Tom’s Cabin, H.B. Stowe
Slavery and Freedom: An Old South, James Oakes
Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville; Richard C. Heffner
The Civil War, Bruce Catton
Dialogues of Plato, (Bantam Classics)


Shaping History Through Photography and Music: Cultural History (Grades 10, 11 & 12)
Course Credit:1/2
Duration:Semester

Photographs and music present a reflection of the times in which they are made. Pictures and songs have also been responsible for informing, changing public opinion and ultimately changing history. This course will examine well- known photographs that have made a cultural or historical impact and will also study the event shown in detail to arrive at a greater understanding of the impact of photography in a cultural or historical context. Students will also select, analyze and present photos of specified time periods to the class for discussion. Each era chosen for study will also incorporate the study of music and its function as a reflection of culture. Students will also be expected to make individual selections of music to analyze and present to class. While the main focus of the class will be the Twentieth Century, it will not be limited to region or country. This will be a semester long class and is open to 10th , 11th and 12th grade students.



Social Studies Department